Second Temple Model of Jerusalem Relocated to the Shrine of the Book

Model In Its Original Home

The Shrine of the Book and the Model of Second Temple Jerusalem

The model of Second Temple-era Jerusalem, recently relocated to a spectacular new home next to the Shrine of the Book at the Israel Museum – itself recently refurbished – has made these two sites companion pieces illuminating the time of Jesus.

The model of Second Temple-era Jerusalem, recently relocated to a spectacular new home next to the Shrine of the Book at the Israel Museum – itself recently refurbished – has made these two sites companion pieces illuminating the time of Jesus.

Home of the Dead Sea Scrolls discovered at Qumran, the Shrine of the Book is considered a landmark of twentieth-century museum architecture. It displays the Dead Sea Scrolls, the earliest copies of the Hebrew Bible ever found. Thus, it seemed natural to reinstall the Second Temple model of Jerusalem – depicting the city at the height of its architectural glory – next to the Shrine at the Israel Museum. A corridor links the two sites, emphasizing that together they have much to teach visitors about the period that witnessed both the building and destruction of the Second Temple, and the ministry of Jesus.

The Model of Second Temple Jerusalem, one of the capital’s best-loved visitor sites, first opened in 1966 on the grounds of a Jerusalem hotel. It was built at the behest of the hotel’s owner, Hans Kroch, in memory of his son Jacob who fell in Israel’s War of Independence. But when construction activities around the hotel necessitated the model’s move, the Israel Museum welcomed it, and it was reopened in 2006. The 1:50 model now occupies 21,500 square feet. Ancient Jerusalem’s palaces, homes, courtyards, gardens, theater and markets are all there in intricate detail, crowned by the Temple, the spiritual center of the Jewish People and the largest building project in the world of its day […HERE]

See the Shrine of of the Book Site HERE

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